Leehurst Swan School

Salisbury

Independent Co-Educational Day School

Tel: 01722 333094

Y11 Common Room Home to Table Football

04-10-2019

The new addition to the Year 11 common room is proving to be popular! Our hard-working pupils deserve some fun and down time when not in the class room.  After its arrival yesterday evening, Mr Ayres and the Estates team felt it was only right to 'safety test' the equipment!

The Origins of Table Football (Foosball)

The history of Table Football is as interesting and diverse as the sport's many names. The game is also known as "Foosball," in the United States, which is actually just a perversion of the German word "Fussball," which means football. Table Football is also known as "Baby Foot," especially in the United Kingdom and Ireland, and as "Kicker" in Switzerland, Belgium and Germany.

Like many sports, the history and origins of Table Football (or Foosball/Baby Foot/Kicker) is difficult to determine. It is likely that similar games developed in different parts of the world simultaneously, making it difficult to attribute an exact place and date to the creation of the game. Sports historians theorise that Table Football began in the late 1800s in Europe, and this seems likely, as the first organised soccer leagues developed in the early 1860s.

The first recognised patent for a Foosball table dates back to 1901 in the United States, though it is likely the sport had already been around for 20 or 30 years in Europe. But by all accounts, Table Football only became popular with a mass audience after World War II.

One reason for the game's increasing popularity after the war was its widespread use in assisting the rehabilitation of veterans. Table Football is known to improve hand-eye coordination, and being a very social and addictive game, it was very beneficial to shell-shocked and otherwise disenfranchised soldiers returning to civilised society from the brutality of the war.

(Source: http://www.table-top-gaming.co.uk/table-football/info/table-football-history.html)

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